Jewelry is one of the most precious possessions that are crafted to last for generations. They are most intimate and cherished investment. Knowing how to care and protect the treasured jewelry will assure the lasting quality and will make huge difference in maintaining its flawless beauty.

These are simple, basic guidelines for the care and cleaning of your jewelry:

Store your jewelry in a clean, dry place.

Keep your jewelry in a fabric-lined jewelry case, or in a box with compartments and dividers. If you prefer to use ordinary boxes, wrap each piece individually in soft tissue paper.

Don't jumble your jewelry pieces in a drawer or jewelry case. Pieces can scratch each other.

Be careful when removing your jewelry to wash your hands. Do not leave your jewelry on the rim of a sink where it can easily slip down the drain.

KEEP YOUR JEWELRY AWAY FROM CHEMICALS

Exposure to chemicals can damage or discolor precious metals – gold, silver and platinum – and may harm some colored gems. Even everyday substances like hairspray, lotion, perfume or other cosmetics can contain chemicals that will permanently damage the surface of your pearls and other delicate or porous gems (like turquoise). Fine jewelry should be removed before diving into a chlorinated swimming pool or before using household cleaners. Many of these cleaners contain ammonia, which can be too harsh for delicate gems or antique jewelry. Chlorine bleach, another common household solvent, can pit or damage gold alloys.

Prevent Jewelry Loss & Repairs

See your jeweler at least once a year to have your jewelry checked for loose prongs, worn mountings, and general wear and tear. Visit your jeweler every six months to have your jewelry professionally cleaned.

GIVE GEMS SPECIAL CARE

Many colored gemstones are routinely treated to improve the appearance of color and clarity. These treatments can be negatively affected by heat, solvents, steam and ultrasonic cleaners. Knowing whether your gem has been treated is the first step to knowing how to care for it. This is where a GIA report comes in – it contains important information about your gem and any detectable treatments it may have undergone.